Goats

Goat Terms and Definitions

Buying goats is an exciting and somewhat stressful time. Make your experience a bit easier by learning some of the general terms and their definitions.

  • ADGA: American Dairy Goat Association
  • AGS: American Goat Society
  • Buck: Also know as a billy. A sexually mature male that is intact and used for breeding
  • Bleat: A goat’s vocal expression or them talking
  • Buckling: A sexually immature or young male
  • Butting: A method of fighting and playing where one animal strikes the head of another
  • Butterfat: Cream content in milk
  • Caprine: The scientific name of goats
  • Caprine Arthritis Encephalitis (CAE): An infectious disease that causes arthritis and progressive inflammation in one or more organs or tissue systems. This disease affects goats and is currently incurable. Please make sure all goats you own or purchased are check yearly for this.
  • Castration: removing of the testicles. (at this point they are known as wethers)
  • Chevre: Classic soft French cheese made with goat milk
  • CL (Caseous Lymphadenitis): An abscess disease of goats that is highly contagious.
  • Closed Herd: No other animals are introduced or exposed to the herd
  • Colostrum: The first milk the doe (mom) produces after given birth. The milk is thick and golden yellow in color and contains rich antibodies. VERY important all kids receive this within 30 minutes of birth.
  • Cross Breed: a goat whose parents are of 2 different breeds
  • Curd: Coagulated milk solids
  • Cull: To kill or remove a sick, weak, old, or otherwise subpar animal from the herd
  • Dam: Female parent
  • Dairy Goats: Goats that are used for milk production
  • Dehorner: or Disbudder. Hot iron used to burn of horn buds on baby goats
  • Disbudding: Removing the horns (usually done when 1-2 weeks old)
  • Doe: Can also be known as a nanny. A sexually mature female goat
  • Doeling: A young female that is not yet sexually mature
  • Drenching: To administer an oral dose of liquid
  • Dry or Dry Period: Time when female is not producing milk
  • Dry Off: Stop milking at the end of a doe’s lactation cycle
  • Forage: The hay or gross portion of a goats diet
  • Free Choice: Feed that is always available so he can eat whenever and as much as he wants
  • Freshen: When a doe gives birth and is now producing milk
  • Gestation: Period in which doe is pregnant (generally 5 months)
  • Herd: A group of goats
  • Heat: Period the doe is ready to mate
  • Hoof Trimmers: Special sharp shears/scissors used to cut goat’s hooves so they don’t become overgrown and possibly infected
  • Inbreeding: Mating of closely related individuals
  • In Milk: After a goat has given birth and is producing milk
  • Johne’s Disease: A bacterial disease causing severe weight loss and diarrhea. No current cure for this
  • Kid: A goat less than 1 year old
  • Kidding: Having babies
  • Kidding Box: Otherwise known as a disbudding box. Small box used to hold the goat while you disbud.
  • Lactation: A period in which a doe produces milk
  • Manure: Poop
  • Mastitis: Inflammation of the udder. generally caused by a bacterial infection
  • Meat Goat: Type of goat raised for meat production
  • Milk Replacer: Artificial milk substitute fed to young goats
  • Open: Female that is not pregnant
  • Orifice: Opening at the end of the teat
  • Papered: Has certificate of registry
  • Parlor: Location the goat is milked
  • Polled: Naturally hornless
  • Postpartum: Occurring after the birth
  • Purebred: An individual whose parents are of the same breed and can be traced back to the establishment of that particular breed through the records of a registry association
  • Ration: Total feed given to each goat in a 24 hours period
  • Registered: Goat whose birth and lineage has been recorded by a registry association
  • Rotational Grazing: A system by which livestock are allotted to a certain grazing or browsing area for a certain period of time before they are moved to another area
  • Rumen: The large first compartment of a ruminant’s stomach containing a microbial population that is capable of breaking down forages and roughages
  • Ruminant: Animals that have a four-compartment stomach (rumen, reticulum, omasum, and abomasum or true stomach)
  • Scours: Diarrhea
  • Scurs: Essentially a small piece of horn that shows up on some polled goats or failed disbudding
  • Service: Mating
  • Settled: Female that is pregnant
  • Sire: Male parent
  • Stanchion: Also known as a milk stand. Device that restrain the goat by the neck. Used for milking, grooming, feeding, and artificial insemination
  • Tattoo: Permanent inked identification generally in the ear, or in the tail web
  • Tattoo Gun: Instrument used for permanently placing ink under the skin of a goat’s ear or tail web to identify it’s herd and year and order born
  • Teat: Projection from the udder from which milk flows. Female goats should have 2
  • Teat Dip: Liquid you dip each teat into after milking to keep orifice clean and the teats and udder free of bacteria and healthy
  • Teat Spray: A liquid usd to sanitize and clean the udder before milking
  • Udder: Mammary glad of goats that secretes the milk
  • Udder Balm: Cream you can place on the udder after milking or nursing to keep them moisturized, clean, and healthy
  • Urinary Calculi: Disease in males. The formation of stones within the urinary tract. It is caused primarily by an imbalance of dietary calcium and phosphorus
  • Waste Milk: Throwing milk out because it is contaminated with vaccines or medications
  • Wean: To separate nursing offspring form their mothers so they are no longer drinking milk
  • Wether: Castrated male
  • Whey: The watery part of milk that remains after the formation of curds
  • Withdrawal Period: Timeframe vaccinations and medications must not be administered so it is not in the system and can not contaminate the meat or milk
  • Yearling: Goat between 1 and 2 year of age

Ok there are so many more terms, but these are the general ones you should make yourself familiar with.

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave